Reviews

Most 2020 Nissan Pathfinders will have the convenience features that families need. The crossover lacks standout options that others in the class now offer, including advanced driver-assistance technologies and second-row captain’s chairs, but the basics are all covered. 

Starting from an average score, the 2020 Pathfinder wins points above average for its base infotainment system, but it lacks smartphone compatibility. It’s a 6. (Read more about how we rate cars.)

Every Pathfinder gets at least 18-inch wheels, seating for up to seven, keyless ignition, cloth upholstery, up to six USB ports, and an 8.0-inch touchscreen for infotainment, and automatic emergency braking. 

Like last year, the Pathfinder is available in S, SV, SL, and Platinum trims with a Rock Creek Edition package available on SV and SL trims. The Pathfinder S costs $32,725, including destination, all the way up to a Pathfinder Platinum that costs $43,965. All-wheel drive is an option on every Pathfinder for $1,690. 

We wouldn’t stray far from the base Pathfinder unless heated seats or blind-spot monitors are must-haves. The 2020 Pathfinder SV offers both (heated seats cost extra) and costs $35,515 to start. It adds a power-adjustable driver’s seat, adaptive cruise control, and a leather-wrapped steering wheel that’s heated. 

The Pathfinder Platinum goes all-in with 20-inch wheels, leather upholstery, heated and cooled front seats, heated second-row seats, dual-pane sunroof, premium audio, navigation, wood trim, a surround-view camera system, and power-adjustable front seats and a power-adjustable steering wheel. Pathfinder Platinum crossovers start at $43,695, including destination. 

A rear-seat entertainment package is available for $1,700 on Platinum versions, but its value is dubious. Tablets or smartphones could probably accomplish that task better.

Nissan infotainment

All Pathfinders come with an 8.0-inch touchscreen for infotainment, with Bluetooth and USB connectivity but not Apple CarPlay or Android Auto compatibility. There are redundant hard buttons beneath the touchscreen for navigation and audio, including a clickwheel controller that’s only mildly useful. 

Navigation is included in SL and Platinum versions (optional on SV models), but we’d prefer the convenience of Waze, Google Maps, or Apple Maps, instead. 

The touchscreen can wash out in direct sunlight, and although the matte finish resists smudges better than shiny screens, it also soaks in sunlight. 

Nissan’s native navigation system isn’t as slick as others in the class, and the menus can be confusing at first. 

It’s best to set frequently used destinations into the navigation system, such as work or home, and use those quick buttons instead of manual destination entry, which can be frustrating. 

Review continues below

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